Most people associate Lomography with the Diana and Holga cameras, . . . the easiest way to explain Lomography is as an ideology. The point is simply this: carry your camera, take pictures and enjoy the process of taking said pictures.

Posted on December 20, 2012

Lomography Part I

Essay length: 451 words.
Reading time: ~ 2 minutes.

Lomography Part 1

My friend shared this article with me the other day: “Did the Lomo camera save film photography?” (http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-20434270) Of course, I immediately clicked on the link and read the article...how could one little camera save an entire industry?!?

What I really like about this article is the description of the little known history behind the Lomo camera. Most people associate Lomography with the Diana and Holga cameras, and this is a refreshing article describing how the Lomo camera was the impetus for the Lomography movement. Read the article if you want to know about the history, but the easiest way to explain Lomography is as an ideology. The point is simply this: carry your camera, take pictures and enjoy the process of taking said pictures. Many will debate over what Lomography means, how it got started, and even if the increased exposure lately is beneficial to film photography.

 A simple search of Lomography on the internet will bring you to sites where you can see the images, join a “club,” purchase the products and more. It all started with a plain, black, simple 35mm camera from Russia and now there is no end to the colors, models and accessories that are available. The best part is that your investment can be minor or significant, so it really is accessible to all! There is even a site where you can purchase modified Holgas. These are loved by many, but of course the purists will tell you that modifying the Holga takes away its natural and unpredictable charm.

What do I say? I love the attention that Lomography brings to film photography. Hollywood stars are now seen carrying their hip, cool, trendy Lomo or Diana camera around and that always gets people interested. Some people believe that the so called “younger generation” is now excited about film photography. After all, they have only been exposed to the digital industry. They are fascinated with this “new” thing called film. Some are bored, some are curious, but who cares? If they buy film and have fun, then the end result is good for two reasons: they are enjoying themselves taking pictures and they are supporting the film industry. As far as I’m concerned, that is a win- win for those of us who are die-hard film shooters.

And, now I realize that the article reminded me of something: where is my Holga? It has been a plan of mine for awhile to have my very own plastic toy camera. One I could use to go have fun creating whimsical and unpredictable images. And isn’t that the point? Stay tuned, because that Holga is en route, and I plan to follow up with some thoughts and some results!

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